WHealthTech

Silicon Valley is bristling with health. It’s the new boom. Venture Capital is pouring money into start-ups that have inventions to help track, monitor or measure some bodily function. We are able to measure at a distance, diagnose over the internet and perform surgery across the world via satellite feed with robotic arms. Massive computing power enables us to analyze entire libraries of data at lightning speed, enabling researches to scrutinize public data for connections between rare diseases and our DNA. Digital connectivity is accelerating, and promises to not only enhance relationships with our caregivers, but to drive efficiencies that should reduce the crippling cost of healthcare.

At the same time, patients are increasingly demanding knowledge and control over their healthcare. The average person on the street has an expanding appetite for health, and seeks the insight and tools to secure and maintain this. Large corporations are recognizing the human and financial value in driving employee health. We’re participants in a thrilling awakening.

These are exciting times. But as with any explosion in science, the overload of data, devices and knowledge can be confusing. Which exercise tracker should I buy? Which app will help me lose weight? Should I visit my doctor, or consult somebody via internet video service? Should I put my health data in the cloud?

As physicians, it is our job to help you to sift through the reams of emerging science and technology. Through WHealthTech, we will help you to differentiate the major breakthroughs from the experiments. We will help you decide between the must-have technology and the nice-to-have gadgets and gizmos. We will invite experts to address burning questions, and will profile major discoveries and advances.

I confess that I am a tech lover. It started with my professional interest in evaluating the condition and performance of elite athletes. I had a state-of-the-art exercise laboratory where I performed complex physiological monitoring of top athletes. But I was really interested in their physiological performance during competition and training. I wanted to understand how efficient they were while rowing in a real race, or swimming in the finals of a championship meet. I wanted to know how they slept before the big game, and how this differed from their regular sleep pattern. I couldn’t take my expensive, bulky equipment to them, and each time I came close I interfered with their performance. Since then, I have watched many exciting technologic advances that have enhanced our ability to monitor the body in health and disease; from tiny cameras that we can swallow and enable us to view the intestinal tract, to the multitude of health apps on my own phone and their connection with my smart watch.

Health is our greatest Wealth. Hence, WHealthTech and BodyWhealth. Join us in the discussion. Educate yourself and others, and lets use technology efficiently and effectively as we all strive for optimal WHealth!